Static Displays and Rides

Many of the aircraft on display at the KC Air Show offer pleasure rides either prior to or after the daily schedule of the KC Air Show. For those offering rides you will see a link that will take you directly to the group offering rides for each aircraft. Anyone purchasing a ride on any of these aircraft will be expected to have an air show ticket if flying on either Friday or Saturday. Rides booked on Monday will not require an air show ticket. Please make sure you use the links provided as there are many scammers out in our world that will try and trick you to go to a non- authorized website.

Be sure to check back over the next few weeks, we'll be adding more displays and rides soon!

B17 Yankee Air Museum

B-17, also called the Flying Fortress, was a U.S. heavy bomber used during World War II. The B-17 was designed by the Boeing Aircraft Company in response to a 1934 Army Air Corps specification that called for a four-engined bomber at a time when two engines were the norm.

B17 aircraft from the Yankee Air Museum

Ford Tri-Motor Yankee Air Museum

The Ford Tri-Motor (nicknamed the “Tin Goose”) is an American three-engined transport aircraft. Production started in 1925 by the companies of Henry Ford and ended on June 7, 1933. A total of 199 Ford Trimotors were made.

Ford Tri-Motor from the Yankee Air Museum

Ikes Bird-Aero Commander

This 1955 Aero Commander L-26B is nicknamed "Ike's Bird".

From 1955 to 1960 it was used by the Eisenhower Administration and the White House to carry the President, Vice President, First Family and other VIP's on short distance trips. It is the smallest plane ever to be used as Air Force One.

Ikes Bird Aero Commander

The Stearman

RIDE IN A WWII OPEN COCKPIT TRAINER!

Designed in 1934 to meet a US Army specification for a new training airplane, the PT-13 Kaydet was the iconic American training aircraft of World War II. Around 10,000 Stearmans were manufactured for service with the US Army, US Navy (as the N2S), Canada, The Philippines, and many Central American countries. Our PT-13A was accepted by the US Army in 1940 and served throughout the war. Take a ride in this historic plane for only a $249.00 tax deductible donation.

Stearman

B-25 Show Me

Ride on a WWII bomber!

The B-25J-30-NC SN 44-31385 now flying as "Show Me" was delivered on June 11, 1945. Her initial assignment was to Yuma Field, Arizona where she was flown. Three days later, she was flown to Williams Field, Arizona and attached to the 3010th Base Unit. In January of 1946, she was moved to Mather Field. She was used as a navigator trainer until February of 1957 when she was moved to McDill AFB, Florida. Here, she was used as both a pilot and navigator trainer until October 1958 when she was put into storage at Davis Monthan AFB, Arizona. When she was retired from active duty, she had 5525 total airframe hours.

B-25

TBM Avenger

Ride on a WWII bomber!

During the years leading to the Korean War, TBM Avengers were mustered for training and active duty. TBM-3E #53353 was assigned to VS-27 which was an Air Anti-Submarine Squadron.

Designated as a trainer during the Korean War, #53353 and assigned to VS-27 whose aircraft had seen action off the carriers USS Kula Gulf, USS Siboney and USS Boxer Island. All three carriers from WWII were reactivated for use as trainers for pilots heading to the Korean Peninsula

TBM Avenger

A-10 Thunderbolt

Affectionately called the “A-10 Warthog” for its aggressive look and often painted with teeth on the nose cone, the A-10 Thunderbolt II is the U.S. Air Force’s primary low-altitude close air support aircraft. The A-10 is perhaps best known for its fearsome GAU-8 Avenger 30mm gatling gun mounted on the nose. The GAU-8 is designed to fire armor-piercing depleted uranium and high explosive incendiary rounds.

A-10 Thunderbolt

Aeronca L-3

The Aeronca L-3 was a high-wing, light airplane sometimes called the “Grasshopper”. These aircraft were first built in 1941 to test the use of light aircraft for liaison and observation missions in direct support of ground forces.

Aeronca L-3B

AV-8B Harrier

The AV-8B Harrier II is the U.S. military’s only short takeoff, vertical landing jet aircraft in current inventory. Originally flown in the late 1960s, the Harrier has undergone a series of improvements that have increased safety, range and lethality. The AV-8B is a key component of the Marine Corps’ “all STOVL force” concept, allowing Marines to be supported in austere conditions in expeditionary environments.

AV-8B Harrier

C-130 Hercules

The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the tactical portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for airdropping troops and equipment into hostile areas.

C-130 Hercules

C-5 Galaxy

The C-5M Super Galaxy is a strategic transport aircraft and is the largest aircraft in the Air Force inventory. Its primary mission is to transport cargo and personnel for the Department of Defense.

C-5 Galaxy

F-18

The F/A-18 Hornet is an all-weather jet aircraft that is used by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps as both a fighter and attack platform. In its fighter mode, the F/A-18 is used primarily as a fighter escort and for fleet air defense; in its attack mode, it is used for force projection, interdiction and close and deep air support.

F-18

CH-47 Chinook

The CH-47F Chinook is the Army’s only heavy-lift cargo helicopter supporting combat and other critical operations. Originally fielded in the Vietnam War, the CH-47 has undergone a series up upgrades to increase lift and airworthiness in combat environments.

CH-47 Chinook

KC-46 Pegasus

The Boeing KC-46 Pegasus is an American military aerial refueling and strategic military transport aircraft developed by Boeing from its 767 jet airliner. In February 2011, the tanker was selected by the United States Air Force (USAF) as the winner in the KC-X tanker competition to replace older Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers. The first aircraft was delivered to the Air Force in January 2019.[1] The Air Force intends to procure 179 Pegasus aircraft by 2027.

KC-46 Pegasus

L-3 Grasshopper

The L-3 was initially designated the O-58 at the time it was first ordered by the Air Corps, a designation prefix that was retired in April 1942. The airplane underwent service tests in the summer of 1941 during maneuvers in Louisiana and Texas.

When American forces went into combat after Pearl Harbor, the Army Air Force used the L-3 in much the same manner as observation balloons were used during World War I — spotting activities and directing artillery fire. It was also used for liaison and transport duties and short-range reconnaissance which required airplanes to land and take off in short distances from unprepared landing strips.

L-3 Grasshopper

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